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Excellence Through Equity
While the movement for standards and accountability has largely succeeded in bringing greater attention to the issues surrounding student achievement, surprisingly little attention has been given to what it takes to create conditions in schools that will make achievement more likely. Missing from much of the policy debate related to achievement is how to support and cultivate effective teaching in schools. This presentation will describe strategies that have proven effective elsewhere at supporting teaching and learning. It will make explicit reference to strategies that are useful in public schools. It will also explore how schools can develop effective partnerships with parents and community groups to further efforts to raise achievement.
This talk was presented at:
National Title I Conference
February 2017 in Long Beach, CA
For more information:
pnoguera.booking@gmail.com
Speakers
Pedro Noguera

Pedro Noguera is the Distinguished Professor of Education at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA.  His research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions, as well as by demographic trends in local, regional and global contexts.  He is the author of twelve books and over 200 articles and monographs. He serves on the boards of numerous national and local organizations and appears as a regular commentator on educational issues on CNN, MSNBC, National Public Radio, and other national news outlets. Prior to joining the faculty at UCLA he served as a tenured professor and holder of endowed chairs at New York University (2003 – 2015) Harvard University (2000 – 2003) and the University of California, Berkeley (1990 – 2000). From 2009 - 2012 he served as a Trustee for the State University of New York (SUNY) as an appointee of the Governor. In 2014 he was elected to the National Academy of Education.  Noguera recently received awards from the Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, from the National Association of Secondary Principals, and from the McSilver Institute at NYU for his research and advocacy efforts aimed at fighting poverty.